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English 101: MLA Citations, with Martha Nagel: MLA Citations

In this Guide 

Use this guide to find examples for citing the sources you may use in your essays. 

If you have any questions or need help, contact me at meryl.geffner@edmonds.edu.  You can also consult the library's MLA Citation Guide

Why is it important to cite?

► It gives credit to the person or organization who has the idea or thought.

► It shows that you have read and understood what others have written on your topic.

► It helps your instructor, or whoever is reading your paper or essay, find the sources you used, if they want to read more about your topic.

► It helps you avoid plagiarism

Citation tips

► You need to cite anytime you paraphrase, summarize or quote information that is not your own.

► It doesn't matter where you found your source.  It can be from a library database or free floating on the web.  Cite it!

► It doesn't matter what type of source it is.  It can be an article in print, a review online, an image, a phone interview or en email conversation.  Cite it!

► Always give credit to the author in two places:

  • Within your essay.  This is called an in-text citation.  In-text citations are last name (or title in quotation marks if there is no author) and page number (if there is one)
  • At the end of your essay on a Works Cited page.

► There can be more than one correct way to cite a specific source - focus on what your reader needs to know in order to find it

Your Librarian

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Meryl Geffner
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Contact:
meryl.geffner@edmonds.edu
425.640.1525